Siegfried Sassoon

His Library
Monogram

Books from the library of Siegfried Sassoon

All of these books were once owned by Siegfried Sassoon and formed part of his library. I have collected them over a number of years of searching. The above monogram was pasted inside the front cover of all the books from Sassoon’s library that were auctioned off by Sotheby’s in 1991. It was added as proof of provenance so that people could see they were genuinely bought at the sale. I have indicated below which books have the monogram. Look at the books on this page and then click here for more information about Sassoon’s library. Many of these books were presented to Sassoon by their authors at various times.

Title:

Marpessa (Monogram)

Author:

Stephen Phillips, Illustrated by Philip Connard

Publisher:

John Lane

Date:

1901

Description:

A poem

Title:

Ruminations in Rhyme (Monogram)

Author:

Henry King

Publisher:

Buvington Press

Date:

1907

Description:

Collection of poems by Henry King

Title:

Tantalus (Monogram)

Author:

Dorothy Easton

Publisher:

Heinemann

Date:

1923

Description:

A novel

Title:

A Gateway to Poetry (Monogram)

Author:

Compiled by Elizabeth Sturch

Publisher:

Gramol Publications Ltd.

Date:

1946

Description:

Collection of poems for boys and girls.

Title:

The Demon Lover and Other Stories (Monogram)

Author:

Elizabeth Bowen

Publisher:

Jonathan Cape

Date:

1946

Description:

A collection of short stories

Title:

The Judgement of Peers (Monogram)

Author:

Compiled by W. G. Bebbington

Publisher:

Staples Press

Date:

1949

Description:

Poem, “At the Grave of Henry Vaughan.”

Title:

The Harrap Book of Modern Verse (Monogram)

Author:

Edited by Maurice Wollman and Kathleen Parker

Publisher:

George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd.

Date:

1958

Description:

Four poems

Title:

Christmas and Other Poems (Monogram)

Author:

Katharine Kendall

Publisher:

Privately Published

Date:

c1961

Description:

Eleven poems

Spindrift

Spindrift - By Vivian de Sola Pinto, published in 1918 by Chapman and Hall Ltd. This book was presented to Sassoon by Vivian de Sola Pinto who was his second in command while they served with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers in France during the First World War. He was know as ‘Velmore’ in the Sherston Memoirs.

The book is inscribed: “To Siegfried Sassoon from Vivian de Sola Pinto S. Hilaire July 1918.” The village of St. Hilaire was part of the front line during 1918. There is no Monogram.

Spindrift Inscription

Autobiography of Margot Asquith

The Autobiography of Margot Asquith Volumes I and II - Published in 1920 by Thornton Butterworth.

These books belonged to Nellie Burton, a good friend of Sassoon, and have her ownership stamp on the inside front cover (top right). They later went into Sassoon’s library as indicated by the provenance label (bottom right).

Nellie Burtons Name

Provenance Monogram

Dr. Sheppard’s Peace Demonstration Programme

Peace Demonstration

Dr. Sheppard’s Peace Demonstration Programme - The programme above belonged to Siegfried Sassoon, the Sotheby’s proof of provenance monogram at the bottom left hand corner in the centre image above proves this to be the case.

This demonstration took place at the Royal Albert Hall, 14th July 1935. It was organised by the Rev. H.R.L. Sheppard, the Canon and Precentor of St. Paul’s Cathedral and one of the Chaplains to His Majesty King George V. This was a single fold programme, page 3 being four hymns to be sung during the meeting. The cover picture is by Arthur Wragg and shows a cenotaph encasing a stricken soldier and dripping with blood. This was produced as a large poster but was banned from the London Underground Stations at the time because it was “too gruesome.”

The programme is subtitled:

 “Weep not for me but for yourselves,”

Inside on page 2 is the statement:

 “I renounce War and never again, directly or indirectly, will I support or sanction another.”

There were four speakers at the demonstration, Siegfried Sassoon’s contribution was to read extracts from his war poems. The following descriptions appear on page 4:

  • Dr. Maude Royden, C.H. D.D. Joint founder of the Guildhouse and a Pacifist during the war. Authoress of many works of a social and religious character. Lecturer and “the greatest woman preacher of our time.”
  • Mr. Edmund Blunden, M.C. M.A. F.R.S.L. Poet and author. Served as an Infantry Officer during the last war and wrote “Undertones of War.” Formerly Professor of English Literature, Tokio University.
  • Mr Siegfried Sassoon, M.C. Poet and Author. Hawthornden Prize. Served as an Infantry Officer during the last war. Wrote “Memoirs of an Infantry Officer.”
  • Brig.-General F. P. Crozier, C.B. C.M.G. D.S.O. Croix de Guerre. Served in South African War and the last War and other Wars as an Infantry Officer and a Commander. Sometime Inspector-General of the Lithuanian Army and Commandant of the Police in Ireland during the Insurrection. Author of “A Brass Hat in No Man’s Land” and other war books.

H W Massingham Book and Letter

H.W. Massingham was the editor of the Nation, a leading British radical weekly newspaper, between 1907 and 1923. Massingham published a number of Sassoon’s poems in the paper during these years. Equally as  important, he was highly enough thought of by Sassoon to be asked his advice before Sassoon went ahead with his protest and was one of the people to whom Sassoon sent a copy of his original statement at the time.

This Book, H.W.M. A Selection From the Writings of H. W. Massingham, which belonged to Sassoon, was published in 1925 by Jonathan Cape and edited by Massingham’s son, H. J. Massingham, (H.W.M. died in 1924). The letter, dated 16th February 1922, was sent to Sassoon by H.W. Massingham commenting on a poem Sassoon had submitted for publication ‘Reynardism Revisited,’ and also stating, “I’ll take all you care to write.” (The book carries the Sassoon ownership monogram.)

HERITAGE - An Anthology of English Poems
This booklet, published by the News Chronicle in 1941, contains the poem “Sing Bravely” which was originally published in ‘The Heart’s Journey’ in 1928. The book carries the Sassoon monogram which confirms that it came from his own library and was later sold at auction.

Heritage

Smaragda’s Lover - By W. J. Turner
This book is a play, published in 1924. Strictly speaking the book does not belong in this section as there is no proof it came from Sassoon’s library. However, it was given to someone by Sassoon as it bears his monogram on the front endpaper so he must have owned it at some point. This was Turner’s second play (the first was not a critical success), hence Sassoon’s annotation ‘(second attempt!)’.

Smaragda's Lover

Sassoon's Monogram

Cephalus and Procris

The book on the left, ‘Cephalus and Procris - an episode between two wars’ by Eric George, once belonged to Siegfried Sassoon. The book carries the Sassoon monogram sticker inside the front cover as provenance that it was part of the great Sotheby’s sale of 1991 when many books from Sassoon’s library were auctioned off.

The book, a First Edition, was published by Harvill Press of London in 1954 and the publishers included a Compliments Slip (shown left), which reads:

“With the compliments of the Author and Publishers - With Compliments - (Publication date - 27th September, 1954) - The Harvill Press Ltd, publishers, 23 Lower Belgrave Street, London S.W.1...”

We will never know if Sassoon actually read this book, which is a 106 page poem based on a Greek myth. The pages are in mint condition and do not appear to be thumbed in any way which probably tells its own story!

Cephalus and Procris by Eric George

Beyond The Sunrise

The book on the left, Beyond The Sunrise by James Bramwell, once belonged to Siegfried Sassoon. The book carries the Sassoon monogram sticker inside the front cover as provenance that it was part of the great Sotheby’s sale of 1991 when many books from Sassoon’s library were auctioned off.

The book, a First Edition, was published by William Heinemann Ltd in 1934 and the publishers included a Compliments Slip (shown left), which reads:

“Messrs. William Heinemann have the pleasure of sending this copy of - Beyond The Sunrise 3/6d net, by James Bramwell, Publication date June 11th - for the favour of a review.”

I do not know whether Sassoon did review  this book or not, which is a collection of twenty-nine poems. The cover states they are poems written objectively rather than subjectively which was the fashion of the day.

Beyond The Sunrise by James Bramwell

Bysshe's Art of English Poetry

Bysshe's Art of English Poetry

Bysshe's Art of English Poetry

BYSSHE, Edward - The Art of English Poetry: Containing I. Rules for Making Verses, II. A Dictionary of Rhymes, III. A Collection of the Most Natural, Agreeable and Sublime Thoughts, Viz. Allusions, Similes, Descriptions and Characters, of Persons and Things.... London. Printed for Sam. Buckley: And Sold By Dan. Midwinter., 1705. Second Edition.

8vo.[4], 36pp, [2], viii, 38pp, [8], 436pp. Each of the three parts with separate title pages. Recased in recent antique style full panelled calf, contrasting red title label, gilt. With original calf to lower board relaid. New endpapers. A very good copy. Various English and Latin manuscript notations to fly-leaves, half-title and title, occasional ownership inscriptions throughout of a William Smith, Birmingham. First published 1702, the third part of this work was criticized for its reduction of poetry to mechanical quotations based on themes. The rhyming dictionary, however, was the first serious attempt at such a compilation by any English author. Hogarth satirizes its use in his ‘Distrest Poet,’ 1736, but in reality copies were found in the libraries of Johnson, Goldsmith, Blake, and evidently continued to be consulted by later poets.

The above copy of Bysshe’s Art of Poetry was owned by Siegfried Sassoon, and was first sold along with many more of his books, letters and manuscripts by Sotheby’s on 18th July, 1991. The catalogue states: “To record the provenance, we have placed a small label with Sassoon’s monogram in each of the books.” The book carries this label (right), which some people think is Sassoon’s own bookplate. The labels are always the same size and made from a textured paper so they cannot be duplicated.

Sotheby's Provenence Monogram

Yorick' Sermons

Another book from Siegfried Sassoon’s own library: Sterne’s Sermons 1st edition Volume 4 in original binding: Sterne, Laurence; The Sermons of Mr. Yorick. Vol. IV. London; T Becket and P A De Hondt, 1766. First edition. Contemporary speckled full calf in fine condition, spine with 4 raised bands and original gilt red morocco title label. Gilt double rules to board edges, spine bands and head and foot of spine. With Sotheby’s, Sassoon monogram label as provenance.

Ballades and Other Verse

Ballades and Other Verse by H.S. Mackintosh. Published in 1953 by Rupert Hart-Davis. This book is from the library of Siegfried Sassoon and carries the auction dispersal label in the bottom left corner as provenance (see right).

Also, cut out by Sassoon and slipped into the book, is a newspaper clipping of the poem “How to get on in Society” by John Betjeman.

Ballades Inside

Awaitment 1930

Awaitment - This poem was added as a separate loose leaf on handmade paper in a card cover, to the special limited edition of The Path to Peace, (Keynes A62b), published in 1960, by the Stanbrook Abbey Press. This copy belonged to Siegfried Sassoon and carries the provenance monogram.

Awaitment 1930

Awaitment 1930

All Our Yesterdays

All Our Yesterdays

Inscription by Edmund Blunden

All Our Yesterdays - By H.M. Tomlinson, published in 1930 by William Heinemann Limited. Tomlinsion was a good friend of both Siegfried Sassoon and another of the most important First World War poets, Edmund Blunden. This copy once belonged to Sassoon and is inscribed to him by Blunden. Also with the book are two press cuttings from Durrant’s, Sassoon’s press cutting service, one is an article about war books by Tomlinson himself from the St. Martin’s Review, dated November 1920, and the other is an article about war memoirs, by William Jeffrey, from the Glasgow Herald, dated 1st November, 1930. A third insert is a page from the Nation & Athenaeum, containing a story about cricket at Lord’s, dated 5th July, 1930. The book carries the Sotheby’s auction monogram (bottom left, middle picture) showing that it once formed part of Siegfried Sassoon’s own library.

Waiting for Daylight

Waiting For Daylight

Waiting For Daylight

Waiting For Daylight - By H.M. Tomlinson, published in 1922 by Cassell and Company Limited. This copy once belonged to Siegfried Sassoon who wrote his name on the inside front cover and dated it 25.4.22 (see above right). The book carries the auction dispersal monogram as provenance, and with it are two press cuttings, one from a press cutting service dated 12th January, 1930, and is an article from the New York Times about Tomlinson and his lack of confidence in the ongoing disarmament talks. The other is a cutting from an unknown publication of an article by Tomlinson on the subject of broadcasting.

Her Privates We

Her Privates We and Cuttings

Cuttings

Her Privates We - By Private 19022, published in 1930, by Peter Davies (this copy fifth impression, February 1930). This book once belonged to Siegfried Sassoon and contains two press cuttings in it from his press cutting services. The first is from Durrance Press Cuttings, and is an article from the Nation and the Athenaeum, dated 15th February, 1930. It is a letter to the editor from Lyn Irvine, replying to criticism of a review she had written of this book. The second cutting is from the International Press Cutting Bureau, and is an article taken from the Cape Argus (Cape Town), dated 22nd March, 1930. The article speculates on the identity of the author of ‘Her Privates We,’ later to be revealed as Frederick Manning. The writer does name Manning as a candidate, but also suggests Siegfried Sassoon, stating it is “just the sort of book he would write.”

Illusion 1915

Illusion 1915 Inscription

Illusion 1915 Title Page

ILLUSION: 1915 - (Above and below) By H.M. Tomlinson, published in 1928 by Harper Brothers. Tomlinson had been a war correspondent and Siegfried Sassoon met him while working as a book reviewer at the Daily Herald. They soon became good friends, lasting until Tomlinson’s death in 1958. Tomlinson had this book published for distribution amongst his friends at Christmas 1928. It is not known how many were published but it can be imagined that it was a very short run. This copy was given to Siegfried Sassoon and carries the Sotheby’s label of provenance. It is inscribed "To Siegfried from F.M. & H.M. Tomlinson Christmas 1928 (with apologies for all military errors)." The type from which it was printed was destroyed.

Illusion 1915 Xmas Message

Illusion 1915

The Ballad of Beau Brocade Cover

The Ballad of Beau Brocade Title

The Ballad of Beau Brocade Provenance

The Ballad of Beau Brocade and Other Poems of the XVIIIth Century ... With Fifty Illustrations by Hugh Thomson. Published in London by Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., 1892. Bound in contemporary three quarter grey crushed levant with marbled boards and endsheets. Frontis, illustrations and plates. First printing of this edition (small paper issue). A fine association copy, being a gift from the young Siegfried Sassoon, and his younger brother, Hamo, to their mother, inscribed on the recto of the ad leaf: "For Mamsy from Siegfried. and Hamo." While the inscription is undated, it is in Sassoon's relatively early hand, most likely not much later than later than 1900. Hamo Sassoon was born in 1887 and was killed during the Gallipoli Campaign, on the 1st November 1915. With the Sotheby’s label for the posthumous dispersal of Sassoon's library on the front pastedown.

Inscription

Inscription: This inscription is interesting in more than one way. There appears to be a full stop after “Siegfried,” and the following two words “and Hamo” appear to be in a different hand with a lighter touch with the pen. Is it possible that Siegfried wrote his inscription and, whether asked by Siegfried or not, Hamo then added his name also? It is fascinating to think that both brothers wrote the inscription.   

Mansoul (Or, Riddle of the world)

MANSOUL (or, The Riddle of the World), by Charles M. Doughty. Published in 1920 by Selwyn & Blount.As a young boy Sassoon had read Doughty’s books The Dawn of Britain and Arabia Deserta, and in 1909 had sent him a copy of one of his specially bound volumes of Sonnets and Verses.The book also carries the Sotheby’s monogram label as proof that it came from Siegfried Sassoon’s own library.

Siegfried Sassoon's Signature

Lalla Rookh

Lalla Rookh, An Oriental Romance, by Thomas Moore. Published in 1822 by Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown.This book was once owned by Siegfried Sassoon. He wrote his monogram on the front endpaper and dated it 1903, he would have been 17 years old at that time. Sassoon began collecting books from the age of 14.The book also carries the Sotheby’s monogram label as proof that it came from Siegfried Sassoon’s own library.

1903 Monogram

The Guiding Hand - By Robert Hendon (Siegfried Sassoon’s own copy)
The Guiding Hand by Robert Hendon, published in 1952 by The Adventurers, Boston. This book came from Siegried Sassoon’s own library and carries the Sotheby’s monogram on the inside of the front cover (see photo right). This book was a Reviewer’s Copy, stamped in red ink on the ffep, so it must have been sent to Sassoon in the hope that he would write a review. Whether he did or not is unknown. The book is in near Fine condition and is complete with its glassine wrapper.

The Guiding Hand

The Guiding Hand Title Page

The Guiding Hand Sotheby's Monogram

LEDA - By Aldous Huxley (Siegfried Sassoon’s own copy)
LEDA by Aldous Huxley, published in 1920 by Chatto & Windus. This book came from Siegried Sassoon’s own library and carries the Sotheby’s monogram on the inside of the front cover (see photo right). Tucked inside is a page torn from another publication containing another of Huxley’s poems, Arabia Infelix.

Leda

Leda Sotheby's Monogram

Green Song

Green Song and other poems by Edith Sitwell, published in 1944 by Macmillan & Co. Ltd. The book was once owned by Siegfried Sassoon and formed part of his library which was auctioned off after his death. The book carries the monogram (right), fixed to the inside front cover by Sotheby’s, to prove its provenance.

Green Song

A Miscellany of Poetry 1919

A Miscellany of Poetry 1919 Edited by W. Kean Seymour, published in 1919 by Cecil Palmer and Hayward. The book, which contains the publishers compliments slip, was owned by Siegfried Sassoon and formed part of his library which was auctioned off after his death. The book carries the monogram (right), fixed to the inside front cover by Sotheby’s, to prove its provenance.

A Miscellany of Poetry 1919

Steps To Parnassus

Steps To Parnassus by J. C. Squire, published in 1919 by Howard Latimer Ltd. Folded within the book are two pages torn from ‘Everyman’ dated November 26th, 1931, (right), containing a short play by J. C. Squire entitled ‘Charade.’ The book was once owned by Siegfried Sassoon and formed part of his library which was auctioned off after his death. The book carries the monogram, fixed to the inside front cover by Sotheby’s, to prove its provenance.

Steps To Parnassus

Devils Dyke 1 936

Devil’s Dyke with Compliment and Satire by Christopher Hassall, published in 1936 by William Heinemann Ltd. Sassoon disliked the ‘modern’ poetry which was in fashion in the 1930’s, and in 1936 he stated that Christopher Hassall was one of the few new ‘traditional’ poets that gave him hope. This book was once owned by Siegfried Sassoon and formed part of his library which was auctioned off after his death. The book carries the monogram (right), fixed to the inside front cover by Sotheby’s, to prove its provenance.

Devils Dyke Monogram

Swinburne's Collected Poetical Works

Swinburne's Collected Poetical Works

Swinburne's Collected Poetical Works Monogram

Swinburne’s Collected Poetical Works (Two Volumes), published in 1924 by William Heinemann Ltd. After acquiring these two volumes I was delighted to discover that Sassoon had written two lines from Swinburne’s poem ‘Cor Cordium’ on the title page of Volume I (centre). The lines are ‘O wonderful and perfect heart, for whom the lyrist liberty made life a lyre.’ These books were once owned by Siegfried Sassoon and formed part of his library which was auctioned off after his death. The books carry the monogram (right), fixed to the inside front covers by Sotheby’s, to prove their provenance.

Such Bounty

Inscription

Such Bounty - Published in Landour, India in 1958, by Myra Scovel. “Verses written during almost thirty years on the Mission Field in China under Chinese, Japanese and Communist rule, in America on furloughs and in India.” This paperback book, consisting of 48 poems over 62 pages was given to Siegfried Sassoon by the author who wrote an inscription on the first page (above right): “To Siegfried Sassoon, a poor way to show gratitude for all his poems have meant to me, but for Emily’s sake, - - Myra Scovel.” The book carries the Sassoon monogram as provenance.

Frederick Gilman Scovel entered Hamilton College in 1921. He went on to take his medical degree at Cornell, where he met a nurse named Myra Scott. They married after his graduation in 1929 and the following year they and their newborn son sailed for China as employees of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions. After language training in Peking, the Scovels were assigned to a hospital in Shantung Province. In 1943 the entire family, which had grown to include four more children, was interned by the Japanese. After six months' detention the Japanese deported them to the United States; Myra Scovel gave birth to a sixth child within hours after their ship docked in New York Harbor. In 1946 the Scovels returned to China, this time to Anhwei Province. They transferred to the Hackett Medical Center in Canton in 1948, remaining there until 1951 when they were forced out by the Chinese Communists. In 1953 they began a six-year term of service to the India Mission, working as professor and librarian at the Christian Medical College in Ludhiana. In 1959 they returned to the United States for the last time. Dr. Scovel began a private practice in Stony Point, NY, and Myra Scovel wrote several books, some based on her family's China and India experiences and some written for children.

The King

The King: A Tragedy in a Continuous Series of Scenes, by Stephen Phillips, published in 1912 by Stephen Swift and Co. Ltd. The book carries the Sotheby’s 1991 auction monogram (below) confirming provenance.

The King Title Page

The King Monogram

a

The Bard of Dimbovitza

Bookseller Label

Inscription

Monogram Label

The Bard of Dimbovitza: Romanian Folk-Songs Collected From The Peasants - by Helene Vacaresco, Carmen Sylva and Alma Strettell. Published in 1914 by Harper & Brothers. This book came from Siegfried Sassoon’s own library and was presented to him by Ottoline Morrell. The book is inscribed and dated in ink on the front endpaper: ‘SS from OM 1916.’ Ottoline Morrell was living at her country home, Garsington Manor, near Oxford at this time, and as can be seen from the bookseller’s label, the book was bought in Oxford. The picture below this shows the provenance monogram label fixed to all Sassoon’s books that were sold at auction by Sotheby’s in 1991. Ottoline Morrell was a very good friend to Siegfried Sassoon and had a massive effect on his life after they met, as can be seen in the Ottoline Morrell page.

War and the Future

War and the Future Inscription

War and the Future Monogram

War & The Future - by H. G. Wells, published in 1917 by Cassell and Company, Ltd. This book came from Siegfried Sassoon’s own library. The picture on the right shows the provenance monogram label fixed to all Sassoon’s books that were sold at auction by Sotheby’s in 1991. In June of 1917, Sassoon sent a copy of his statement against the war to Wells, among others, and Wells was supportive. Sassoon visited him in 1922, recording that "I am grateful to (and full of admiration for) the bristling pugnacious little man for the way he succeeds in influencing (and creating) public opinion in the direction of sanity...," and they remained in contact in later years. The signature and date (centre) tie this book down specifically to that crucial period.

Letters From Syria

Inscription

Press Cuttting

Letters From Syria - by Freya Stark, published in 1942 by John Murray. This book came from Siegfried Sassoon’s own library. The book is inscribed and dated in ink on the front endpaper; “To Siegfried Sassoon from Sydney Cockerell Christmas 1942.” From 1908 to 1937 Sydney Cockerell had been Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge where he built up the museum’s collection of private press books and manuscripts, this would appear to be the origin of his friendship with Sassoon. The book also contains a clipping from ‘The Bookseller’ dated 24th September 1942, sent from Sassoon’s press cuttings service, Durrants, entitled ‘Books Prohibited in P.O.W. Camps in Germany.’ Sassoon appears on this list of authors whose books were banned due to his Jewish ancestry. The book also carries the Sotheby’s provenence monogram confirming it was from Sassoon’s own library.

Experiment In Autobiography

Cuttings Volume 1

Inserts Volume 2

Experiment in Autobiography: Discoveries and Conclusions of a Very Ordinary Brain (Since 1866) - by H. G. Wells, (two volumes) published in 1934 by Victor Gollancz Ltd. and The Cresset Press Ltd. This book came from Siegfried Sassoon’s own library. Sassoon and Wells were great friends and there are numerous cuttings, tear-sheets and other items enclosed within these two volumes presumably inserted by Sassoon:
 
Volume I:
  • Almost full page from The Sunday Express, 2 October 1927 ‘The Possibility of War Between Britain and America.’ On the reverse a story about “Dick” Sheppard.
  • Page from a publication containing a ‘Birthday Letter’ to Wells written by H. M. Tomlinson.
  • Newspaper clipping containing an article entitled ‘The Radiant Presence of H. G. Wells.’
  • Large cutting from ‘The Times Literary Supplement,’ 8 November 1934, entitled ‘Mr. Wells as Autobiographer.’ Mentions his book ‘Experiments in Autobiography’ which had been published in that year.
  • Tiny newspaper clipping stating that Wells had left £59,811, presumably in his will.
  • Page torn from ‘The Listener’ 10 September 1953, with article written by Bertrand Russell entitled ‘H. G. Wells: Liberator of Thought.’
  • Almost full page cut from ‘Harper’s Bazaar’ October 1929, entitled ‘H. G. Wells’ Garden,’ with photographs.
  • Change of address card stating Wells had moved from Whitehall Court to St. Ermins, Westminster.
  • Change of address card stating Wells, from Easton Glebe, Dunmow (his country address), and St Ermins, Westminster, had now moved to Chiltern Court, Clarence Gate, which was now his sole English address.
Volume II:
  • A sewn memorial booklet entitled ‘In Memory of Amy Catherine Wells (Jane Wells).’ Amy, who died on 6 October 1927, was Wells’ second wife. This booklet contains the address which was read at the cremation service which Sassoon most likely attended.
  • A broadside printing of Wells’ letter to the ‘Dancing Times,’ defending the new ballet ‘Les Noces,’ from criticism of its modernism. This sheet, dated 18th June 1926, was handed out at the various performances and it is possible Sassoon, who was a ballet lover, took this home from one of them.

The books also carry the Sotheby’s provenance monogram confirming they were from Sassoon’s own library.

A Distant Prospect

A Distant Prospect with Monogram

A Distant Prospect with Inscription

A Distant Prospect - A Sequel to First Childhood - By Lord Berners, [a.k.a. Gerald Tyrwhitt]. Published in 1945 by Constable. First edition. A presentation copy to Siegfried Sassoon from his wife (from whom he would soon separate a few months later), inscribed (right), on the front free endsheet: "Siegfried with much love from Hester. July 1945." With the Sotheby’s posthumous library dispersal label on the front pastedown (centre), confirming the book came from Sassoon’s own library.

The English Eccentrics

The English Eccentrics Monogram

Clipping of Prince of Wales

The English Eccentrics - By Edith Sitwell, published in 1933 by Faber & Faber. First edition (one of 2748 copies printed, of which approximately 750 were exported and equipped with a cancel title for use as the US issue). From the library of Siegfried Sassoon, with the Sotheby’s posthumous monogram library dispersal label (centre). Laid in (right), is a clipped news photo of the Prince of Wales, with the eyes subtly defaced by Sassoon to make it appear HRH is ogling the legs of a group of nurses standing for inspection. Sassoon has pasted an extra piece of text on to the bottom of the clipping which reads: “He could well afford to laugh.” (Click here to see in larger detail).

Alexander Pope

Rapallo 12.4.30

Sotheby's Label

Cuttings

Alexander Pope - By Edith Sitwell, First Edition, published in 1930 by Faber & Faber. This is actually, one of at least two copies owned by Sassoon - with his ink ownership monogram in the upper corner of the front pastedown, dated "Rapallo 12.4.30," and with his manuscript corrections, queries, or comments in at least four places in the text. Sassoon was on holiday in Rapallo, Italy, with his lover Stephen Tennant at this time. Laid in are the clipped spine panel of the dust jacket, front jacket picture, three clippings related to Pope, and a clipping of J. C. Squires's review of this book for THE OBSERVER. Sassoon and Edith Sitwell connected as early as 1917, when through Robert Ross, she wrote to him at Craiglockhart to commend him on his anti-war statement. There ensued a long acquaintance, made difficult by Sassoon's animosity toward her brother Osbert. In 1930, she wrote to him in the wake of a lapse in their friendship: "...you were one of my most intimate friends, and I have missed you more than I can say...." The following year she dedicated JANE BARSTON, one of her poems in the original Ariel Poems series, to him. The Sotheby’s posthumous library dispersal label appears on the front pastedown to show the book’s provenance.

Adam Cast Forth Cover

Adam Cast Forth Inscription

Adam Cast Forth Front Board

Adam Cast Forth - By Charles M. Doughty, published in 1908 by Duckworth. As a young man, Sassoon had greatly admired Doughty’s work, including The Dawn in Britain and Arabia Deserta. It was in 1909 that Sassoon sent one of only three specially bound volumes of his book of poetry ‘Sonnets and Verses’ to Doughty as a gift. As can be seen, Sassoon signed and dated this copy which came from his own library. The picture on the right shows the inscription and the Sotheby’s posthumous library dispersal label on the front pastedown.

The Titans Cover

The Titans Inscription

The Titans Inside Front Cover

The Titans - By Charles M. Doughty, published in 1916 by Duckworth. As a young man, Sassoon had greatly admired Doughty’s work, including The Dawn in Britain and Arabia Deserta. It was in 1909 that Sassoon sent one of only three specially bound volumes of his book of poetry ‘Sonnets and Verses’ to Doughty as a gift. As can be seen, Sassoon signed this copy which came from his own library. The picture on the right shows the inscription and the Sotheby’s posthumous library dispersal label on the front pastedown. There are a number of annotations in ink by Sassoon in the margins plus a newspaper clipping from the Sunday Times dated October 27th, 1929, of a review written by Desmond MacCarthy of ‘The Testament of Beauty’ by Robert Bridges,

Cherwell

Cherwell, Published in 1948 by Oxford University, controlled and edited by undergraduates. This 24 page magazine was once owned by Siegfried Sassoon. He has written “Page 13” on the front cover to denote the page containing three poems written by his friend Haro Hodson. The magazine also carries the Sotheby’s monogram label as proof that it came from Siegfried Sassoon’s own library.

Confessions of a Young Man, Published in 1928 by William Heinemann Ltd, (The Traveller’s Library). Siegfried Sassoon wrote his monogram on the front pastedown right, and dated it 6.6.28. The book also carries the Sotheby’s monogram label as proof that it came from Siegfried Sassoon’s own library.

A Bibliography of the Works of John Galsworthy, By H. V. Marrot, published in 1928 by Elkin Mathews & Marrot. Included with the book are three items below right; one is the publishers order form (blank), for a book entitled ‘Willow and Windflower’ by Andrew G. C. Gibson. Also, there is a newspaper clipping containing a review of this bibliography, on which is written in ink “From Auntie”, and lastly a double page leaflet below left entitled ‘Torture of British Horses in Continental Slaughter Houses - Exposure of Ghastly Traffic’, dated March 5th, 1930. Published by the International League Against the Export of Horses for Butchery. Written in ink across the bottom of the last page of this leaflet is: “One of the chief deterrents to the use of the humane killer in France is that it destroys the brain, which sells for a high price.” The book also carries the Sotheby’s monogram label as proof that it came from Siegfried Sassoon’s own library.

The Story of the Durham Miners 1662-1922

Durham Miners Signature

The Story of the Durham Miners (1662- 1921) By Sidney Webb, published in 1921 by the Fabian Society. From Siegfried Sassoon’s own library. On 27th April, 1921, Sassoon wrote in his diary (Page 64, Siegfried Sassoon Diaries 1920-1922, Rupert Hart-Davis, pub. Faber 1921): ‘...Coal strike unsettled. Read Webb’s book on Durham Miners last night...’ This is that book, and as can be seen, Sassoon wrote his name at the top of the front cover.

Liberty In The Modern State

Laski Inscription

Sassoon Monogram

Liberty in the Modern State - by Harold J Laski, published in 1930 by Harper & Brothers, New York and London. This is a nice association copy of Laski’s book, dedicated to Siegfried Sassoon, dated, 30.4.30, and carrying the dispersal label confirming it was from Sassoon’s own library.

Harold Joseph Laski (30 June 1893 – 24 March 1950) was a British political theorist, economist, author, and lecturer. He was active in politics and served as the chairman of the British Labour Party during 1945–1946, and was a professor at the London School of Economics from 1926 to 1950. After 1930, he shifted to a Marxist emphasis on class conflict and the need for a workers' revolution which angered Labour leaders. Laski's position on democracy came under further attack from Winston Churchill in the 1945 general election, and the Labour party eventually had to disavow Laski, its chairman.

In 1920 Sassoon embarked on a series of lectures at various institutions in the United States. For a period during this time he had stayed at Harold Laski’s house, who had done a great deal to help and encourage him in America and who was teaching at Harvard University.

The Muse & The Mastiff

The Muse & The Mastiff – A Dramatic Poem by Ralph Hodgson. Published in 1942 by Boerner Printing Co., for the author. This book is from the library of Siegfried Sassoon and carries the Sotheby’s auction dispersal label in the bottom left corner (right) as provenance.

The Muse & The Mastiff Frontis

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